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Conserving, Restoring and Managing the United States Caribbean Fishery Resources, in the EEZ Around Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands
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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

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CARIBBEAN

  1. How many countries and territories are in the Greater Caribbean Region?

BAJO DE SICO

  1. What is Bajo de Sico?
  2. How has Bajo de Sico historically been managed?
  3. Why were changes made to Bajo de Sico regulations?
  4. What were the previous regulations in Bajo de Sico?
  5. What are the current changes to regulations in Bajo de Sico?

MANAGEMENT OF QUEEN CONCH IN FEDERAL WATERS

  1. What changes are being made to federal queen conch regulations is the U.S. Caribbean?
  2. What is the purpose of this rule?
  3. Where is Lang Bank?
  4. What are the federal regulations for queen conch?

ACLS 2010

  1. What fisheries will be affected by the 2010 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit (ACL) Amendment?
  2. What actions does the 2010 Caribbean ACL Amendment contain?
  3. To what waters will the 2010 Caribbean ACL Amendment apply?

ACLs

  1. What is an ACL?
  2. What Caribbean species are undergoing overfishing and therefore require ACLs and AMs in 2010?
  3. How were the ACLs determined for snapper and grouper species in the Caribbean?
  4. How were ACLs established for queen conch and parrotfish in the Caribbean?
  5. Why are there additional species of snapper and grouper included in the 2010 ACL Amendment?
  6. How can ACLs be changed?

ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES (AMs)

  1. What are the triggers for implementing AMs in the Caribbean?
  2. Why such a lengthy gap between the year of harvest and the year of application?
  3. What remedies will be applied if AMs are triggered?
  4. What if the landings fall below the ACL?

ADDITIONAL MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

  1. What changes are made to the fishery management units?
  2. Why is there a prohibition on harvest of midnight, blue, and rainbow parrotfish?

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  1. When will the changes take effect?
  2. How can I participate in Caribbean fisheries management?

ACLS 2011

  1. What fisheries will be affected by the 2011 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit?
  2. What actions does the 2011 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit Rule contain?
  3. To what areas will the 2011 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit Amendment apply?

ANNUAL CATCH LIMITS

  1. What is an Annual Catch Limit?
  2. What Caribbean species require annual catch limits and accountability measures in 2011?
  3. How were the Annual Catch Limits for 2011 determined for species in the U.S. Caribbean?
  4. How can Annual Catch Limits be changed?

ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES

  1. What are the triggers for implementing accountability measures in the Caribbean?
  2. Why such a lengthy gap between the year of harvest and the year of application?
  3. What remedies will be applied if accountability measures are triggered?
  4. What if the landings fall below the annual catch limit?

ADDITIONAL MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

  1. What changes to the conch resources are made by the 2011 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit final rule?
  2. What changes are made to aquarium trade species?

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  1. When will the changes take effect?
  2. How can I participate in Caribbean fisheries management?

 

If you have any additional question regarding any council related matters please contact us.

To open some documents in this site you will need Adobe Reader,  Download Free Adobe Reader XI software.

 


ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS


CARIBBEAN

How many countries and territories are in the Greater Caribbean Region?

The Great Caribbean Region is composed of about 44 countries and territories. List of countries and territories.

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BAJO DE SICO

What is Bajo de Sico?

Bajo de Sico is an area off the west coast of Puerto Rico (See Figure 1);

It has been identified as an important site for resident groupers including the red hind, Nassau and yellowfin groupers;

It is also an important foraging site for these and numerous other species.

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How has Bajo de Sico historically been managed?

Bajo de Sico was originally open to all fishing activities prior to regulations being implemented in 1996.

The Bajo de Sico area closure was first implemented as a means to protect spawning aggregations of red hind.

Commercial fishermen in the area noticed decreases in fish size and total catch (pounds) and a decrease in the number of individuals comprising the spawning aggregations. Commercial fishermen proposed three seasonal area closures (Bajo de Sico, Tourmaline Bank, and Abrir La Sierra Bank) to protect the spawning aggregations and in 1996, a regulatory amendment to the Reef Fish Fishery Management Plan (FMP) established a closed season from December 1 through the last day of February, each year.

In 2005, the Comprehensive Sustainable Fisheries Act Amendment to the Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch, Reef Fish, and Corals and Reef Associated Plants and Invertebrates FMPs (Comprehensive SFA Amendment) was implemented to prohibit the use of bottom tending gear (traps, pots, gill and trammel nets, and bottom longlines) in all seasonally closed areas, including Bajo de Sico, to enhance protection of essential fish habitat (EFH). This amendment also implemented the requirement for an anchor retrieval system for all fishing vessels designed to minimize anchor damage to EFH.

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Why were changes made to Bajo de Sico regulations?

Recently, nearly pristine coral reef formations in high densities have been discovered in the seasonally protected area;

Large individuals of red hind and many large snappers and groupers have been observed in the area.

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What were the previous regulations in Bajo de Sico?

Fishing with pots, traps, bottom longlines, gillnets, or trammel nets is prohibited year- round;

From December 1 through the end of February, all fishing activities are prohibited.

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What are the current changes to regulations in Bajo de Sico?

Modify the length of the seasonal closure to 6 months (October 1 through March 31); Prohibit fishing for or possession of Council-managed reef fish; and

Prohibit anchoring year-round within Bajo de Sico.

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FIGURE 1


MANAGEMENT OF QUEEN CONCH IN FEDERAL WATERS

What changes are being made to federal queen conch regulations is the U.S. Caribbean?

Prior to the new regulation, when the territorial waters of St. Croix reach their 50,000 pound quota for queen conch, an area of federal waters known as Lang Bank would remain open to queen conch harvest through the end of the fishing season.

With the implementation of the new rule, when the territorial waters of St. Croix reach their 50,000 pound quota for queen conch, it will trigger the closure of Lang Bank to queen conch until the start of the next fishing season.

Additionally, the Lang Bank seasonal closure is being changed from the previous closure of July 1 through September 30, to the new closure of June 1 through October 31, each year.

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What is the purpose of this rule?

To enact compatible regulations for the territorial waters of St Croix and the adjacent federal waters.

To provide further protection for queen conch.

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Where is Lang Bank?

For the purposes of the regulations, Lang Bank is defined as the area east of 64°34’W bound within the 100 fathom curve (Figure 1).

Lang Bank lies within both federal and territorial waters, therefore federal regulations apply to the portions of Lang Bank within the Caribbean exclusive economic zone (EEZ).

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What are the federal regulations for queen conch?

Fishing for or possession of queen conch is prohibited in the U.S. Caribbean EEZ, with the exception of the federal waters of Lang Bank near St Croix. The federal waters of Lang Bank are open for queen conch harvest from November 1 through May 31, or until the quota is reached in territorial waters.

Minimum size limit of nine inches total length and 3/8 inch lip thickness measured at the thickest point of the lip.

Queen conch in or from the EEZ must also be landed with meat and shell intact.

Harvest of queen conch while diving while using a device that provides a continuous air supply from the surface (e.g., “hookah” gear) is prohibited.

For non-commercial fishers, the daily limit is three queen conch per person per day, not to exceed twelve (12) per boat per day.

For commercial fishers, the daily limit 150 queen conch per person per day.

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Figure 1

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ACLS 2010

What fisheries will be affected by the 2010 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit (ACL) Amendment?

Amendments will be made to both the Fishery Management Plan for the Queen Conch Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, and to the Fishery Management Plan for the Reef Fish Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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What actions does the 2010 Caribbean ACL Amendment contain?

Specifies annual catch limits (amount of fish that can be taken without triggering accountability measures) to end overfishing (rate of removal too high) of managed species and species groups.

Defines accountability measures (measures to prevent or address an overage of an annual catch limit)

Reduction in the length of the fishing year in the year following a determination of exceeding the annual catch limits (ACLs).

Defines triggers for implementing accountability measures (AMs).

Establishes framework provisions that allow the Caribbean Fishery Management Council (Caribbean Council) to rapidly respond to changing conditions in the fishery or the environment that supports that fishery.

Changes grouping of several fish species based on habitat type.

Subdivides federal waters of the U.S. Caribbean for purposes of tracking catch and applying AMs.

Treats separately the recreational and commercial fishing sectors in Puerto Rico, where sector-specific landings data are available, but not in the U.S. Virgin Islands where recreational harvest data are not collected.

Prohibits fishing for, or possession of, midnight, blue and rainbow parrotfish in federal waters.

Further reduce St. Croix parrotfish harvest to address uncertain effects of that harvest on essential settlement substrate for Acroporid corals.

Establishes daily bag limits:

Allowing for an aggregate harvest of not more than five fish per fisher per day including not more than two parrotfish per fisher per day or six parrotfish per boat per day; and

15 aggregate snapper, grouper, and parrotfish per boat per day (will not apply to a fisherman who has a valid commercial fishing license).

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To what waters will the 2010 Caribbean ACL Amendment apply?

To all federal waters in the U.S. Caribbean.

For Puerto Rico, federal waters extend from nine nautical miles off the coast of the island to 200 nautical miles off the coast of the island.

For the U.S. Virgin Islands, federal waters extend from three nautical miles off the coast of the islands to 200 nautical miles off the coast of the islands.

In some areas between St. John and the British Virgin Islands the applicable area is smaller due to a division of oceanic waters between national jurisdictions.

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ANNUAL CATCH LIMITS (ACLs)

What is an ACL?

An ACL is the level of annual catch of a population, or population complex, that if met or exceeded triggers AMs, such as a seasonal closure or quota closure.

In the U.S. Caribbean, ACLs are separately set for each of three islands groups: Puerto Rico, St. Thomas and St. John, St. Croix.

ACLs can apply to a single species of fish (e.g., Nassau grouper, goliath grouper, queen conch) or to a group of species (e.g., parrotfish, some snapper, some grouper).

Separate ACLs may be established for each sector of a fishery,(i.e. commercial and recreational), but the combined catch of all sectors may not exceed the total ACL for a species or species complex.

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What Caribbean species are undergoing overfishing and therefore require ACLs and AMs in 2010?

  • Snapper Unit 1 (silk, black, vermilion, blackfin, and wenchman) Grouper Unit 1 (Nassau)
  • Grouper Unit 4 (red, tiger, yellowfin, black)
  • Parrotfish (blue, midnight, princess, queen, rainbow, redfin, redtail, stoplight, redband, striped)
  • Queen conch

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How were the ACLs determined for snapper and grouper species in the Caribbean?

The ACLs for snapper and grouper species are based upon the average catch recorded from each of the island groups, for each of the species groups being considered in this amendment, and for each of the recreational (for Puerto Rico only) and commercial sectors (Table 1).

The date range was chosen since landings during those years were considered consistently reliable across all islands.

Average catches from 1999-2005 were adjusted downward by 15 percent (Table 1) to account for uncertainty in the scientific and management process.

Uncertainty stems from the vagaries of data reporting and time lags in application of corrections in response to changing patterns of catch.

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How were ACLs established for queen conch and parrotfish in the Caribbean?

For queen conch and for all parrotfish, the Caribbean Council’s Scientific and Statistical Committee established an acceptable biological catch level, and the ACL cannot exceed that level for each species.

For queen conch, that level is 50,000 pounds for St. Croix and 0 pounds for Puerto Rico and St. Thomas/St. John (Table 1).

For parrotfish, that level is 255,000 pounds for St. Croix, 68,000 pounds for Puerto Rico, and 42,500 pounds for St. Thomas/St. John (Table 1).

An additional reduction to the parrotfish ACL in St. Croix was implemented to further reduce the impacts of parrotfish harvest on Acropora species.

The reduction resulted in a final ACL of 240,000 pounds for parrotfish in St. Croix waters.

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Table 1

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Why are there additional species of snapper and grouper included in the 2010 ACL Amendment?

Because landings are not reported to the level of individual species throughout the USVI and Puerto Rico (with the exception of snapper in Puerto Rico), average landings cannot be determined for each individual species. It is therefore necessary to propose setting ACLs for species groups rather than for individual species.

ACLs must be set for all species, including those not designated as undergoing overfishing, by 2011. For those species that are to be carried along in this amendment, but are not designated as undergoing overfishing, the process is accelerated but by less than a year.

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How can ACLs be changed?

Through a “framework action” which is based on a series of management options established within a fishery management plan, or through an amendment to that plan.

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ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES (AMs)

What are the triggers for implementing AMs in the Caribbean?

AMs are triggered if actual average landings exceed the established ACL.

The landings used include both those reported from territorial/commonwealth waters and those reported from federal waters.

For example, the queen conch ACL of 50,000 pounds in St. Croix waters is met when the combined harvest of queen conch from federal and St. Croix territorial waters reaches 50,000 pounds.

Though average landings are the combination of landings reported from territorial/commonwealth and federal waters, the AMs only apply to federal waters.

Triggers for implementing AMs are established, based upon a single year of landings in 2011 for applying AMs in 2012; an average of the 2011 and 2012 landings for applying AMs in 2013; and an average of the three most recent years of landings for applying AMs in subsequent years (e.g., average landings for 2011, 2012, and 2013 for triggering application of AMs in 2014).

There can be a substantial delay between the harvest year and the year in which the data become available for analysis and application to AM determinations.

At present, that delay is approximately two years in the U.S. Caribbean.

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Why such a lengthy gap between the year of harvest and the year of application?

All fishermen’s trip tickets must be submitted to local government fisheries agencies and the required timeline for such submissions varies between Puerto Rico (monthly) and the United States Virgin Islands (yearly).

Then, the data must be compiled by the individual territory/commonwealth and passed on to the National Marine Fisheries Service Science Center.

The Science Center then must further compile the data, assure its quality, enter it into the appropriate data base, and conduct necessary analyses.

NOAA and the local governments are working hard to shorten the time between submittal of the trip ticket and application of the data to a determination of the status of each fishery.

The goal is to be able to make these AM determinations during the fishing year.

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What remedies will be applied if AMs are triggered?

The AMs consist of shortening the fishing season in the first year following determination that the ACL for a specific island group/species group/sector has been exceeded.

The season reduction will stay in place until additional data indicate that it needs to be adjusted, and that adjustment can be to a shorter or longer season.

The AMs include a provision that requires the Science Center and the Scientific and Statistical Committee to review the data and make a determination as to whether increased landings are apparent (due to better data collection) or real (due to increased harvest). If the former, then AMs may not be invoked despite an apparent overage of the ACL.

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What if the landings fall below the ACL?

If fewer reef fish or queen conch are harvested than is allowed by the island/species/sector ACL, then that surplus will not be added to the following year’s ACL.

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ADDITIONAL MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

What changes are made to the fishery management units?

  • Creole-fish is removed from Grouper Unit 3;
  • Black grouper is added to Grouper Unit 4;
  • Yellowedge and misty grouper are transferred from Grouper Unit 4 to new Grouper Unit 5;
  • Wenchman is moved from Snapper Unit 2 to Snapper Unit 1;
  • Cardinal snapper is added to Snapper Unit 2.

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Why is there a prohibition on harvest of midnight, blue, and rainbow parrotfish?

NOAA’s Fisheries Service has a responsibility to not only protect threatened species of coral (i.e., staghorn and elkhorn corals are listed as a threatened species), but to protect the habitat upon which these corals depend.

The three species of parrotfish for which harvest is being prohibited are particularly effective grazers, and they are the three largest and therefore slowest reproducing of the Caribbean parrotfish species.

Expert testimony cites a decline in abundance of midnight, blue and rainbow parrotfish, and states concern about losing the important grazing role they play in conditioning substrate for the colonization of corals.

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

When will the changes take effect?

The final rule published in the Federal Register on December 30, 2011 (76 FR 82404). Measures contained with the 2010 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit Amendment are effective January 30, 2012.

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How can I participate in Caribbean fisheries management?

For more information about current regulations and opportunities to become involved in the Council process, visit: http://www.caribbeanfmc.com/

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ACLs 2011

What fisheries will be affected by the 2011 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit?

Amendments will be made to the following Fishery Management Plans:

  • Fishery Management Plan for the Queen Conch Resources of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;
  • Reef Fish Fishery Management Plan of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;
  • Fishery Management Plan for the Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;
  • Fishery Management Plan for Corals and Reef Associated Plants and Invertebrates of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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What actions does the 2011 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit Rule contain?

Specifies annual catch limits (amount of fish that can be taken without triggering accountability measures) to prevent overfishing (rate of removal too high) of managed species and species groups (Table 1).

Defines accountability measures (measures to prevent or address an overage of an annual catch limit)

Reduction in the length of the fishing year in the year following a determination that the annual catch limit has been exceeded.

Defines triggers for implementing accountability measures.

Subdivides federal waters of the U.S. Caribbean for purposes of tracking catch and applying accountability measures.

Establishes framework provisions that allow the Caribbean Fishery Management Council (Caribbean Council) to rapidly respond to changing conditions in the fishery or the environment that supports that fishery.

Treats the recreational and commercial fishing sectors separately in Puerto Rico, where sector-specific landings data are available, but not in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) where recreational harvest data are not collected.

Revises management measures for aquarium trade species and conch species within the Reef Fish, Corals and Reef and Associated Plants and Invertebrates and Queen Conch Fishery Management Plans.

Revises management reference points and overfished and overfishing status determination criteria.

Establishes recreational bag limits for reef fish and spiny lobster species in Puerto Rico:

  • Allows for an aggregate harvest of no more than five reef fish per person per day (of which no more than one can be surgeonfish) and no more than 15 reef fish per vessel per day (of which no more than four can be surgeonfish) in federal waters; and
  • Allows for an aggregate harvest of no more than three spiny lobster per person per day and no more than 10 spiny lobster per vessel per day in federal waters.

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To what areas will the 2011 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit Amendment apply?

  • To all federal waters in the U.S. Caribbean.
  • For Puerto Rico, federal waters extend from nine nautical miles off the coast of the island to 200 nautical miles off the coast of the island.
  • For the USVI, federal waters extend from three nautical miles off the coast of the islands to 200 nautical miles off the coast of the islands.
  • In some areas between St. John and the British Virgin Islands the applicable area is smaller due to a division of oceanic waters between national jurisdictions.

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Table 1

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ANNUAL CATCH LIMITS

What is an Annual Catch Limit?

An annual catch limit is the level of annual catch of a population, or population complex that, if met or exceeded, triggers accountability measures such as a reduction in the length of the fishing year.

In the U.S. Caribbean, annual catch limits are set separately for each of three islands groups:

o Puerto Rico

o St. Thomas and St. John

o St. Croix.

Annual catch limits can apply to a single species of fish (e.g., spiny lobster) or to a group of species (e.g., jacks, wrasses).

Separate annual catch limits may be established for each sector of a fishery (i.e. commercial and recreational), but the combined catch of all sectors may not exceed the total annual catch limit for a species or species complex.

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What Caribbean species require annual catch limits and accountability measures in 2011?

Reef Fish: angelfish, boxfish, goatfish, grunts, hogfish, jacks, scups and porgies, squirrelfish, surgeonfish, triggerfish and tilefish

Spiny Lobster

Aquarium trade species in both the Reef Fish and the Coral and Reef Associated Plants and Invertebrates Fishery Management Plans.

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How were the Annual Catch Limits for 2011 determined for species in the U.S. Caribbean?

Annual catch limits were set based upon average or median landings during defined time periods.

The time period during which average or median catch is calculated for those species is:

  • 1988-2009 for the commercial sector of Puerto Rico (median); o 2000-2009 for the recreational sector of Puerto Rico (median); o 1999-2008 for the commercial sector St. Croix (average); and
  • 2000-2008 for the commercial sector of St. Thomas/St. John (average).
  • Average catches were adjusted downward to account for uncertainty in the scientific and management process.
  • Average or median landings of angelfish and surgeonfish were adjusted downward by 25 percent to account for the herbivore functions of these species benefiting the coral ecosystem;
  • In addition, a similar approach was taken to reduce the annual catch limit for aquarium trade species by 25 percent to account for the lack of historical information about this fishery sector;
  • Average or median landings of all other concerned species were adjusted downward by 10 percent;
  • Uncertainty stems from the vagaries of data reporting and time lags in application of corrections in response to changing patterns of catch.

Note that separate annual catch limits for the recreational sector are only being set for Puerto

Rico because recreational harvest data are only available for that island.

Recreational harvest in the USVI will be determined by the commercial annual catch limit:

  • When the commercial fishery reaches the annual catch limit for any species or species group on any USVI island, accountability measures will be applied to both the commercial and recreational fisheries for that species or species group for that island.
  • When recreational harvest data become available in the USVI, annual catch limits will be developed for the recreational sector on those islands using the newly available data.

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How can Annual Catch Limits be changed?

Through a “framework action” which is based on a series of management options established within a fishery management plan, or through an amendment to that plan.

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ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES

What are the triggers for implementing accountability measures in the Caribbean?

Accountability measures are triggered if actual average or median landings exceed the established annual catch limit.

The landings used include both those reported from territorial/commonwealth waters and those reported from federal waters.

*For example, the queen conch annual catch limit of 50,000 pounds in St. Croix waters is met when the combined harvest of queen conch from federal and St. Croix territorial waters reaches 50,000 pounds.

Though average landings are the combination of landings reported from territorial/commonwealth and federal waters, the accountability measures only apply to federal waters.

Triggers for implementing accountability measures are established, based upon a single year of landings in 2011 for applying accountability measures in 2012; an average of the 2011 and 2012 landings for applying accountability measures in 2013; and an average of the three most recent years of landings for applying accountability measures in subsequent years (e.g., average landings for 2011, 2012, and 2013 for triggering application of accountability measures in 2014).

There can be a substantial delay between the harvest year and the year in which the data become available for analysis and application to accountability measures determinations.

At present, that delay is approximately two years in the U.S. Caribbean.

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Why such a lengthy gap between the year of harvest and the year of application?

All fishermen’s trip tickets must be submitted to local government fisheries agencies and the required timeline for such submissions varies between Puerto Rico (monthly) and the USVI (yearly).

Then, the data must be compiled by the individual territory/commonwealth and passed on to the Southeast Fisheries Science Center.

Recently implemented electronic transmission will expedite the transfer of data from the territory/commonwealth to the Southeast Fisheries Science Center.

The Southeast Fisheries Science Center then must further compile the data, assure its quality, enter it into the appropriate data base, and conduct necessary analyses.

NOAA Fisheries Service and the local governments are working hard to shorten the time between submittal of the trip ticket and application of the data to a determination of the status of each fishery.

The goal is to be able to make these accountability measure determinations during the fishing year.

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What remedies will be applied if accountability measures are triggered?

The accountability measures consist of shortening the fishing season in the first year following a determination that the annual catch limit for a specific island group/species group/sector has been exceeded.

The season reduction will stay in place until additional data indicate that it needs to be adjusted, and that adjustment can be to a shorter or longer season.

The accountability measures include a provision that requires the Southeast Fisheries Science Center and the Caribbean Council’s Scientific and Statistical Committee review the data and make a determination as to whether increased landings are apparent (due to better data collection) or real (due to increased harvest). If the former, then accountability measures may not be invoked despite an apparent overage of the annual catch limit.

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What if the landings fall below the annual catch limit?

If fewer reef fish or queen conch are harvested than is allowed by the island/species/sector annual catch limit, then that surplus will not be added to the following year’s annual catch limit.

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ADDITIONAL MANAGEMENT ACTIONS

What changes to the conch resources are made by the 2011 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit final rule?

The final rule will remove eight species of conch from federal management:

  • Milk conch, Strombus costatus
  • West Indian Fighting Conch, Strombus pugilis
  • Roostertail Conch, Strombus gallus
  • Hawkwing Conch, Strombus raninus
  • True Tulip, Fasciolaria tulipa
  • Atlantic Triton’s Trumpet, Charonia variegata
  • Cameo Helmet, Cassis madagascarensis
  • Green Start Shell, Astrea tuber

These species are not targeted for harvest and are not collected in significant numbers.

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What changes are made to aquarium trade species?

Management of aquarium trade species currently resides within the Reef Fish Fishery Management Plan and Coral and Reef Associated Plants and Invertebrates Fishery Management Plan.

The 2011 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit Amendment recommends the Caribbean Council remove all aquarium trade species from both Fishery Management Plans and create a new Fishery Management Plan.

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

When will the changes take effect?

The final rule published in the Federal Register on December 30, 2011 (76 FR 82414). Measures contained with the 2010 Caribbean Annual Catch Limit Amendment are effective January 30, 2012.

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How can I participate in Caribbean fisheries management?

For more information about current regulations and opportunities to become involved in the Council process, visit: http://www.caribbeanfmc.com/

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If you have any additional question regarding any council related matters please contact us.

 

FAQs taken from: http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov